Is there an app for that? A case study of the potentials and limitations of the participatory turn and networked publics for classical music audience engagement [Recurs electrònic] / Garry Crawford, Victoria Gosling, Gaynor Bagnall & Ben Light

By: Crawford, Garry.
Gosling, Victoria | Bagnall, Gaynor | Light, Ben.
DOI: DOI: 10.1080/1369118X.2013.877953.Description: 16 p. : digital, fitxer PDF (176,21 Kb). In: Information, communication & society, Vol. 17, no. 9 (2014), p. 1072–1085 Vol. 17, no. 9 (2014), p. 1072–1085Online resources: E-Doc | E-Link Summary: The participatory turn, fuelled by discourses and rhetoric regarding social media, and in the aftermath of the dot.com crash of the early 2000s, enrols to some extent an idea of being able to deploy networks to achieve institutional aims. The arts and cultural sector in the UK, in the face of funding cuts, has been keen to engage with such ideas in order to demonstrate value for money; by improving the efficiency of their operations, improving their respective audience experience and ultimately increasing audience size and engagement. Drawing on a case study compiled via a collaborative research project with a UK-based symphony orchestra (UKSO) we interrogate the potentials of social media engagement for audience development work through participatory media and networked publics. We argue that the literature related to mobile phones and applications (‘apps’) has focused primarily on marketing for engagement where institutional contexts are concerned. In contrast, our analysis elucidates the broader potentials and limitations of social-media-enabled apps for audience development and engagement beyond a marketing paradigm. In the case of UKSO, it appears that the technologically deterministic discourses often associated with institutional enrolment of participatory media and networked publics may not necessarily apply due to classical music culture. More generally, this work raises the contradictory nature of networked publics and argues for increased critical engagement with the concept. (Font: Autor)
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The participatory turn, fuelled by discourses and rhetoric regarding social media, and in the aftermath of the dot.com crash of the early 2000s, enrols to some extent an idea of being able to deploy networks to achieve institutional aims. The arts and cultural sector in the UK, in the face of funding cuts, has been keen to engage with such ideas in order to demonstrate value for money; by improving the efficiency of their operations, improving their respective audience experience and ultimately increasing audience size and engagement. Drawing on a case study compiled via a collaborative research project with a UK-based symphony orchestra (UKSO) we interrogate the potentials of social media engagement for audience development work through participatory media and networked publics. We argue that the literature related to mobile phones and applications (‘apps’) has focused primarily on marketing for engagement where institutional contexts are concerned. In contrast, our analysis elucidates the broader potentials and limitations of social-media-enabled apps for audience development and engagement beyond a marketing paradigm. In the case of UKSO, it appears that the technologically deterministic discourses often associated with institutional enrolment of participatory media and networked publics may not necessarily apply due to classical music culture. More generally, this work raises the contradictory nature of networked publics and argues for increased critical engagement with the concept. (Font: Autor)

Introduction -- Engaging audiences via apps -- The research -- Audience engagement through a social-media-enabled app at UKSO -- Project launch and acceptance -- Encouraging engagement via digitally mediated social networks -- Engaging with music -- Supporting engagement ‘in venue’ -- Conclusion -- Acknowledgements -- References

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