Towards a cultural policy for great events [Recurs electrònic] : Local and global issues in the definition of the Olympic Games cultural programme : Lessons from the Sydney 2000 Olympic Arts Festivals / Beatriz García García ; Director: Miquel de Moragas i Spà ; Tutor: José María Ricarte Bescos

By: García García, Beatriz.
Moragas i Spà, Miquel de [dir.] | Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona. Departament de Publicitat i Comunicació Audiovisual.
Publisher: [Barcelona] : [l'autora], 2002Description: 100 p.Online resources: Accés al document Summary: This thesis studies the current state and application of cultural policy principles in the production of a great event's cultural programme. The thesis departs from the idea that cultural policy principles can be a useful tool to guide the design, management and promotion of an event's cultural programme. Furthermore, it is considered that the cultural relevance of a great event is highly dependent on the consistency of the policy choices informing its cultural dimensions both at a global and a local level. In this context, the thesis aims to explore whether notions of cultural policy provide a good platform for managing and communicating the cultural dimension of a great event such as the Olympic Games, in particular, the Games official cultural programme. The thesis uses the Sydney 2000 Olympic Arts Festivals as a case study. Notions and applications of cultural policy are analysed according to the event's global network -the IOC, and its local host- Sydney and Australia. The influence of the event's global network is studied through a historical review of notions of culture in the Olympic Movement and an analysis of the cultural structures and agendas within the IOC. At a local level, convergences and divergences between the event's cultural programme and the cultural policy of the local host are explained on the grounds of the Sydney and Australia's social and political context, the event structures of management, its promotional strategy and its short-term impacts. A key finding of the research is the very limited influence that cultural policy principles have in the production of a great event's cultural programme. The IOC does not have a clearly defined cultural policy and is thus unable to offer a consistent guide for respective Games organisers. This means that success in implementing locally representative cultural programmes depends entirely on the event host community. However, research on the Sydney case and commentary on prior events reveals that cultural planners and policy-makers have a marginal role in the planning and organisation of great events. Instead, events are driven by economic interests and marketing strategies. The thesis concludes that great events such as the Olympic Games frequently fail to leave long-term cultural legacies and are often unable to provide an experience that fully engages and represents the host community. This occurs because there has been an over-emphasis on economic interests while the social and cultural aspects of the event have been deemed secondary. Regardless of the success in developing event marketing and promotional strategies, only the creation of coherent cultural policies can assist securing an event legacy that goes beyond economic impacts and touches host communities and global viewers in meaningful and distinctive ways. (Font: Resum) .Dissertation note: Tesi doctoral, Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona. Departament de Publicitat i Comunicació Audiovisual, 2002
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Tesi doctoral, Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona. Departament de Publicitat i Comunicació Audiovisual, 2002

This thesis studies the current state and application of cultural policy principles in the production of a great event's cultural programme. The thesis departs from the idea that cultural policy principles can be a useful tool to guide the design, management and promotion of an event's cultural programme. Furthermore, it is considered that the cultural relevance of a great event is highly dependent on the consistency of the policy choices informing its cultural dimensions both at a global and a local level. In this context, the thesis aims to explore whether notions of cultural policy provide a good platform for managing and communicating the cultural dimension of a great event such as the Olympic Games, in particular, the Games official cultural programme. The thesis uses the Sydney 2000 Olympic Arts Festivals as a case study.
Notions and applications of cultural policy are analysed according to the event's global network -the IOC, and its local host- Sydney and Australia. The influence of the event's global network is studied through a historical review of notions of culture in the Olympic Movement and an analysis of the cultural structures and agendas within the IOC. At a local level, convergences and divergences between the event's cultural programme and the cultural policy of the local host are explained on the grounds of the Sydney and Australia's social and political context, the event structures of management, its promotional strategy and its short-term impacts.
A key finding of the research is the very limited influence that cultural policy principles have in the production of a great event's cultural programme. The IOC does not have a clearly defined cultural policy and is thus unable to offer a consistent guide for respective Games organisers. This means that success in implementing locally representative cultural programmes depends entirely on the event host community. However, research on the Sydney case and commentary on prior events reveals that cultural planners and policy-makers have a marginal role in the planning and organisation of great events. Instead, events are driven by economic interests and marketing strategies.
The thesis concludes that great events such as the Olympic Games frequently fail to leave long-term cultural legacies and are often unable to provide an experience that fully engages and represents the host community. This occurs because there has been an over-emphasis on economic interests while the social and cultural aspects of the event have been deemed secondary. Regardless of the success in developing event marketing and promotional strategies, only the creation of coherent cultural policies can assist securing an event legacy that goes beyond economic impacts and touches host communities and global viewers in meaningful and distinctive ways. (Font: Resum)
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List of tables and figures – Acronyms – 1st. Part. Research Background: 1. Introduction ; ; 2. Research methodologies -- 2nd. Part. Olympic cultural programme and cultural policy choices: 3. Characteristics of the Olympic Games cultural programme ; 4. Cultural policies of the International Olympic Committee -- 3rd. Part. The case of the Olympic cultural programme in Sidney 2000: 5. Context: cultural, sporting and arts traditions in Australia ; 6. Design: projecting a new image of Sydney and Australia ; 7. Management: collaboration between private and public sectors ; 8. Promotions: communications and marketing plan ; 9. Involvement of existing and potential stakeholders ; 10. Media coverage: content analysis of 1997-2000 press clippings on the Olympic Arts Festivals -- 4th. Part. Conclusions and recommendations for the future -- 11. General discussion and conclusions -- References: Bibliography and archival information ; Web sites ; Interviews ; Forums, Conferences and Public Speeches

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