The Performing arts and the public purse : An economic analysis / John W. O'Hagan, Christopher T. Duffy

By: O'Hagan, John W.
Duffy, Christopher T | Arts Council of Ireland.
ISBN: 0906627192.Publisher: Dublin : The Arts Council/An Chomhairle Ealaíon, 1987Description: 89 p.Summary: Part I of the book is concerned with two issues that are general in nature and apply to a discussion of the performing arts in any market-oriented economy. The first of these is discussed in Chapter 1 and deals with the question of why, if at all, the performing arts should be funded from the public 'purse.' Put more bluntly, the chapter asks why taxpapers who do not partake of the performing arts should be required to provide funds for them. This question is addressed in terms of three issues: the collective benefits generated by the performing arts, unequal access, and lack of information about the performing ans. Chapter 2 examines some of the various ways in which the performing arts can be, and are, funded from the public purse. There are the direct forms of funding, such as the expenditures of arts councils, but there are also the indirect forms, such as taxes forgone because of tax concessions to the performing arts or monies received by a performing-arts company through a public employment scheme, which must be accounted for and analysed. Part II is concerned with the question of direct public funding of the performing arts in Ireland. The Arts Council is the main agency by which the government provides direct funding to the performing arts and its origins, objectives and expenditures are looked at in Chapter 3. It will be seen in this chapter that drama absorbs an extraordinarily large proportion of Arts Council funding in Ireland and this aspect of the performing arts is the subject matter of Chapter 4. The economic characteristics of theatre are examined and the arguments and data of Chapters 1 and 2 are enlarged upon and related specifically to theatre, particularly the National Theatre (Abbey and Peacock). More equal access to the performing arts appears to be a growing priority of the Arts Council in Ireland. The provision of more equal access is also one of the most important arguments for public funding of the performing arts. For these reasons, Part III of the book is concerned with the issue of equal access. Chapter 5 extends and develops the arguments of Chapter 1 concerning the role of public funding in this regard. The meaning of equal access is examined, the available data for Ireland are presented and the policy measures most closely associated with the objective of more equal access, regionalisation and arts centres, are briefly described and appraised. Chapter 6 deals with two important aspects of policy in relation to the performing arts, namely arts festivals and community arts. These impinge not only upon the question of equal access but also on the issues of collective benefits and education, and they are discussed at some length. (Font: Editor)
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Part I of the book is concerned with two issues that are general in nature and apply to a discussion of the performing arts in any market-oriented economy. The first of these is discussed in Chapter 1 and deals with the question of why, if at all, the performing arts should be funded from the public 'purse.' Put more bluntly, the chapter asks why taxpapers who do not partake of the performing arts should be required to provide funds for them. This question is addressed in terms of three issues: the collective benefits generated by the performing arts, unequal access, and lack of information about the performing ans. Chapter 2 examines some of the various ways in which the performing arts can be, and are, funded from the public purse. There are the direct forms of funding, such as the expenditures of arts councils, but there are also the indirect forms, such as taxes forgone because of tax concessions to the performing arts or monies received by a performing-arts company through a public employment scheme, which must be accounted for and analysed.
Part II is concerned with the question of direct public funding of the performing arts in Ireland. The Arts Council is the main agency by which the government provides direct funding to the performing arts and its origins, objectives and expenditures are looked at in Chapter 3. It will be seen in this chapter that drama absorbs an extraordinarily large proportion of Arts Council funding in Ireland and this aspect of the performing arts is the subject matter of Chapter 4. The economic characteristics of theatre are examined and the arguments and data of Chapters 1 and 2 are enlarged upon and related specifically to theatre, particularly the National Theatre (Abbey and Peacock).
More equal access to the performing arts appears to be a growing priority of the Arts Council in Ireland. The provision of more equal access is also one of the most important arguments for public funding of the performing arts. For these reasons, Part III of the book is concerned with the issue of equal access. Chapter 5 extends and develops the arguments of Chapter 1 concerning the role of public funding in this regard. The meaning of equal access is examined, the available data for Ireland are presented and the policy measures most closely associated with the objective of more equal access, regionalisation and arts centres, are briefly described and appraised. Chapter 6 deals with two important aspects of policy in relation to the performing arts, namely arts festivals and community arts. These impinge not only upon the question of equal access but also on the issues of collective benefits and education, and they are discussed at some length. (Font: Editor)

Acknowledgements -- Introduction -- I. Public Funding: General Issues: 1. The Case for Public Funding ; 2. Forms of Public Funding -- II. Direct Public Funding in Ireland: 3. Objectives, Level and Allocation of Arts Council Funding ; 4. Theatre: The Main Fundee -- III. More Equal Access: A Growing Priority?: 5. Equality / Regionalisation/ Arts Centres ; 6. Policy Issues: Arts Festivals and Community Arts -- Appendix I. Arts Community Education (ACE) -- Appendix II. Wet Paint: A Community Arts Case Study -- References

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