Governments and culture / edited by: C. Richard Waits, William S. Hendon, Harold Horowitz

By: (3a : International Conference on Cultural Economics (3a : 1984 : Akron).
Hendon, William S [ed.] | Waits, C. Richard [ed.] | Horowitz, Harold [ed.] | Association for Cultural Economics | University of Akron.
Publisher: Akron : University of Akron, 1985Description: 256 p.Summary: This is volume II of three of the Proceedings of the Third International Conference on Cultural Economics and Planning held April 25-28, 1984, in Akron, Ohio. The theme that links together the papers in this volume is the interaction between cultural activities and government policy. It ls important in summing the impacts of these papers to think in terms of a two-way flow of influence. The arts are feeding information and persuasion into the policy centers of governments at various levels. Government policymakers are submitting information and preferences to the arts community. The other aspect of that theme concerns the role that economic analysis plays in that interactive process. Economists seem to hold themselves apart from the interaction between the arts and government. However, there are a few notable exceptions to this rule as the reader will became aware. The authors of the papers in this volume present a variety of suggestions concerning ways in which economic analysis may be used to inform the judgements made by each of the two separate parties to the interaction. Some of these suggestions are contained in purely theoretical contexts. Other suggestions are conveyed in the process of analyzing policies and still other suggestions are implicit in presentations of case studies of government or other programs designed to support cultural activities in various ways. On that basis, the papers are divided into three groups. In the first section there are two papers in which various needs of policymakers are outlined. Frank Hodsoll spells out some of the areas of analysis that would be helpful to the National Endowment for the Arts. His paper contains a number of suggestions on ways In which economic analysis can contribute to the work of the Endowment. In the other paper Michael Ainslie describes several ways in which economic analysis can assist in achieving the policy goals of the National Trust for Historic Preservation. In the second section of this volume there are five papers all related to various aspects of policy analysis. David Throsby and Dick Netzer discuss some strategies for government intervention in arts markets. This discussion illustrates ways in which policies can be evaluated before they are put in place. David Owl analyzes a set of policies that have been pursued over a period of several years in terms of standards that were outlined at the time the National Endowment for the Arts was formed. Dana Stevens describes a set of standards for the analysis of policy impacts. Michael Hammet contributes another dimension to procedures for analyzing policy. The papers in the third section describe in fairly specific terms a wide variety of government activities in support of the arts. Several papers are focused on particular types of cultural activities. This group includes the papers by Michael Kolmel and Brian Kinsley on the film industry; Gregory Christensen’s paper on Public Broadcasting; the papers by Nancy Grant and Richard Grice on historical preservation; and the paper on symphony organizations by Luksetich, Lange and Jacobs. Other papers concern various aspects of government programs. This group includes the papers on the subject of the distribution of funding at various levels by Mark Schuster, Jiri Zuzanek, Cameron McQueen and others, Berend Langenberg, and Pieter Ligthart. The papers by Glenn Withers, by Dupuis and Greffe, by Chantal Cinquin, by Robert Horn, and by Leslie Singer concern specific programs to support specific types of cultural activity. The commentors have done a good Job of amplifying the original presentations, of reinforcing the positive contributions in the papers, and of pointing out areas in which the papers could have been improved. We think that readers will find these comments helpful. The editors would like to thank Marilyn Forney for having endured the battles with the word processor in order to get this volume to its readers. (Font: Introducció)
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This is volume II of three of the Proceedings of the Third International Conference on Cultural Economics and Planning held April 25-28, 1984, in Akron, Ohio.
The theme that links together the papers in this volume is the interaction between cultural activities and government policy. It ls important in summing the impacts of these papers to think in terms of a two-way flow of influence. The arts are feeding information and persuasion into the policy centers of governments at various levels. Government policymakers are submitting information and preferences to the arts community.
The other aspect of that theme concerns the role that economic analysis plays in that interactive process. Economists seem to hold themselves apart from the interaction between the arts and government. However, there are a few notable exceptions to this rule as the reader will became aware.
The authors of the papers in this volume present a variety of suggestions concerning ways in which economic analysis may be used to inform the judgements made by each of the two separate parties to the interaction. Some of these suggestions are contained in purely theoretical contexts. Other suggestions are conveyed in the process of analyzing policies and still other suggestions are implicit in presentations of case studies of government or other programs designed to support cultural activities in various ways.
On that basis, the papers are divided into three groups. In the first section there are two papers in which various needs of policymakers are outlined. Frank Hodsoll spells out some of the areas of analysis that would be helpful to the National Endowment for the Arts. His paper contains a number of suggestions on ways In which economic analysis can contribute to the work of the Endowment. In the other paper Michael Ainslie describes several ways in which economic analysis can assist in achieving the policy goals of the National Trust for Historic Preservation.
In the second section of this volume there are five papers all related to various aspects of policy analysis. David Throsby and Dick Netzer discuss some strategies for government intervention in arts markets. This discussion illustrates ways in which policies can be evaluated before they are put in place. David Owl analyzes a set of policies that have been pursued over a period of several years in terms of standards that were outlined at the time the National Endowment for the Arts was formed. Dana Stevens describes a set of standards for the analysis of policy impacts. Michael Hammet contributes another dimension to procedures for analyzing policy.
The papers in the third section describe in fairly specific terms a wide variety of government activities in support of the arts. Several papers are focused on particular types of cultural activities. This group includes the papers by Michael Kolmel and Brian Kinsley on the film industry; Gregory Christensen’s paper on Public Broadcasting; the papers by Nancy Grant and Richard Grice on historical preservation; and the paper on symphony organizations by Luksetich, Lange and Jacobs.
Other papers concern various aspects of government programs. This group includes the papers on the subject of the distribution of funding at various levels by Mark Schuster, Jiri Zuzanek, Cameron McQueen and others, Berend Langenberg, and Pieter Ligthart. The papers by Glenn Withers, by Dupuis and Greffe, by Chantal Cinquin, by Robert Horn, and by Leslie Singer concern specific programs to support specific types of cultural activity. The commentors have done a good Job of amplifying the original presentations, of reinforcing the positive contributions in the papers, and of pointing out areas in which the papers could have been improved. We think that readers will find these comments helpful.
The editors would like to thank Marilyn Forney for having endured the battles with the word processor in order to get this volume to its readers. (Font: Introducció)

Introduction / C. Richard Watts -- The Needs of Policy Makers: The National Endowment for the Arts and Cultural Economics: The Information Partnership / Frank Hodsoll -- The Economics of Historic Preservation / Michael Ainslie -- Policy Analysis: Intervention Strategies in Arts Markets / C. David Throsby -- Intervention Strategies in Arts Markets by C. D. Throsby / Dick Netzer -- Changes in the U.S. Audience for the Arts / David Cwi -- The Social Efficiency of Arts Addiction / Dana Stevens -- Public and Private Endorsement for the Arts: Some Problems of Credence / Michael Hammet -- Comment: Donald Harvey -- Case Studies in Policy: Decentralization: Decisionmaking in Direct Aid to the Arts / J. Mark Davidson Schuster -- Municipal Funding for the Arts in Ontario / Jiri Zuzanek -- Methodological Considerations for Evaluating Multilevel Cultural Support Programs / Cameron McQueen, David Black, Frank Graves, David Redmond -- An Evaluation of a Tax Incentive Program for Canadian Film Production / Brian L. Kinsley -- Economic Efficiency vs. Artistic Standard: The Case of Public Support for the Film Industry in West Germany / Michael Kolmel -- Public Policy for Financing the Construction of Theatres in the Netherlands (1945-1980) / B. J. Langenberg -- Financing of the Art Policy by the Dutch Government / Pieter Llgthart -- Artists' Subsidy of the Arts / Glenn Withers -- Subsidies to Cultural Employment: The French Experiment / Xavier Dupuis, Xavier Greffe -- Consulate Support for Artists Overseas: The French Case / Chantal Cinquin -- Using Revealed Preferences of Private Donors To Establish an Efficient Matching-funds Formula. The Case of Public Broadcasting / Gregory B. Christainsen -- The Impact of Renovation of Historic Districts on the Tax Revenue of a City / Nancy K. Grant -- The Origins and Impact of the Restoration of the Public Square of Medina. Ohio / Richard L Grice -- The Productivity of Symphony Orchestra Campaign Expenditures / William Luksetich, Mark Lange, Philip Jacobs -- Culture as a By-product of Marketing / Robert V. Horn -- Nationalism and the Arts Markets: A Theory of Unearned Increments / Leslie P. Singer -- Comments: Nina Gibans, Mark Lange, Marianne V. Felton, Donald Harvey, Arthur Pollock, Edward M. McNertney, V. Krishnan

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