Cultural policy in Croatia : national report / director of the project: Vjeran Katunaric ; editors: Biserka Cvjeticanin, Vjeran Katuraric

Katunaric, Vjeran [dir., ed.] | Cvjeticanin, Biserka [ed.] | Consell de la Cooperació Cultural. Programa Europeu d'Avaluació de les Polítiques Culturals Nacionals dels Països Membres.
ISBN: 9536096153.Publisher: Strasbourg : Council for Cultural Co-operation, 1999Description: 275 p.Summary: Looking at cultural policy in the post, both in Croatia and the world, it is difficult to say that it counterbalanced overall state policy. On the contrary, in the last fifty years or so cultural policy was mainly the fruit of state intervention in culture. In former Yugoslavia the policy of socialist self-management was a combination of state and para-state management (self-management) in culture, of state patronage and participation. After that, in the great political changes at the beginning of the nineties, it was the indigenous national culture that was emphasized in cultural policy and encouraged as a form of distancing from the former all-Yugoslav character which was the remnant of an imposed “monoculture”. What happened to Croatian high culture after this is the subject of analysis in this Report. We generally consider that a national report need not closely follow the prevailing meanings of culture and cultural policy, nor reflect an atmosphere of cultural pessimism. The primarily aim of a report is to objectively describe conditions, explain connections between cultural policy and cultural life, and show a capacity for anticipation and visualization of better conditions. In doing so, one must always bear in mind that overall conditions in culture cannot be ascribed to state cultural policy. A lot has been inherited from earlier times, and pessimism in the cultural élite is not anything new. The cultural élite realizes that national history does not end when national independence has been achieved, and that there is still a difficult path to tread from independence to the dignified existence of an entire nation and its international affirmation. (Font: Editor)
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Looking at cultural policy in the post, both in Croatia and the world, it is difficult to say that it counterbalanced overall state policy. On the contrary, in the last fifty years or so cultural policy was mainly the fruit of state intervention in culture. In former Yugoslavia the policy of socialist self-management was a combination of state and para-state management (self-management) in culture, of state patronage and participation. After that, in the great political changes at the beginning of the nineties, it was the indigenous national culture that was emphasized in cultural policy and encouraged as a form of distancing from the former all-Yugoslav character which was the remnant of an imposed “monoculture”. What happened to Croatian high culture after this is the subject of analysis in this Report.

We generally consider that a national report need not closely follow the prevailing meanings of culture and cultural policy, nor reflect an atmosphere of cultural pessimism. The primarily aim of a report is to objectively describe conditions, explain connections between cultural policy and cultural life, and show a capacity for anticipation and visualization of better conditions. In doing so, one must always bear in mind that overall conditions in culture cannot be ascribed to state cultural policy. A lot has been inherited from earlier times, and pessimism in the cultural élite is not anything new. The cultural élite realizes that national history does not end when national independence has been achieved, and that there is still a difficult path to tread from independence to the dignified existence of an entire nation and its international affirmation. (Font: Editor)

Foreword by the Croatian Minister of Culture -- 1. Introduction -- 1.1. General Approach ; 1.2. The Geography, Demography and History of Croatia ; 1.3. Presentday Croatia -- 2. Cultural Policy of the Republic of Croatia: 2.1. Legal and Organisational Framework ; 2.2. Financing ; 2.3. Decentralisation ; 2.4. Participation in Cultural Life ; 2.5. Art Education ; 2.6. The Labour Market in Culture ; 2.7. Privatization -- 3. Cultural Activities and Cultural Industries: 3.1. Literature and Publishing ; 3.2. Visual Arts ; 3.3. Music ; 3.4. Theatre Arts ; 3.5. Film ; 3.6. The Media -- 4. Cultural Heritage: 4.1. Monuments ; 4.2. Archives ; 4.3. Libraries ; 4.4. Museums -- 5. Internal and International Cultural Relations: 5.1. The Multicultural Mosaic of Croatia ; 5.2. International Cultural Cooperation -- 6. Conclusions -- 7. References -- Appendix

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