Just art for a just city: public art and social inclusion in urban regeneration [Recurs electrònic] / Joanne Sharp, Venda Pollock and Ronan Paddison

By: Sharp, Joanne.
Pollock, Venda | Paddison, Ronan.
DOI: DOI: 10.1080/00420980500106963.Description: 24 p. : digital, fitxer PDF (1,82 Mb).Summary: In this article, it is shown how cultural policy, and in particular public art, intersects with the processes of urban restructuring and how it is a contributor, but also antidote, to the conflict that typically surrounds the restructuring of urban space. The particular focus of the paper is on investigating how public art can be inclusionary/exclusionary as part of the wider project of urban regeneration. The first part of the paper examines examples in which public art intervention has attempted to generate inclusion. Subsequently, attention focuses more on examples in which the public art has been perceived as an aspect of cultural domination and has thus provoked resistance. Throughout, it is argued that the processes through which artworks become installed into the urban fabric are critical to the successful development of inclusion. (Font: Autors)
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e-Journal CERC
Repositori digital
Repositori Digital E170302 Online Available (Accés restringit)

In this article, it is shown how cultural policy, and in particular public art, intersects with the processes of urban restructuring and how it is a contributor, but also antidote, to the conflict that typically surrounds the restructuring of urban space. The particular focus of the paper is on investigating how public art can be inclusionary/exclusionary as part of the wider project of urban regeneration. The first part of the paper examines examples in which public art intervention has attempted to generate inclusion. Subsequently, attention focuses more on examples in which the public art has been perceived as an aspect of cultural domination and has thus provoked resistance. Throughout, it is argued that the processes through which artworks become installed into the urban fabric are critical to the successful development of inclusion. (Font: Autors)

Summary -- Introduction -- Why public art? -- Approaching inclusion -- Public art production and cultural (in)justice: 1. Non-recognition: reclaiming place and recognising past ; 2. Disrespect: giving voice, countering the stereotype and rediscovering the margins ; 3. Cultural domination and the arts of resistance ; 4. Resistance and regeneration ; 5. Problems of process -- Conclusions -- References

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